Latest Photos

2014-10-26-02-18-06_1_JS 2014-10-26-03-01-10_JS 2014-10-26-02-59-31_1_JS 2014-10-20-06-35-23_JS IMG_6255_EAG #IMG_8512 09-12-2014 00-00-00_MPO 2014-10-11-03-33-59_JS
View more photos >


The North Face shoes at PlanetShoes.com


EDITORIALS


Chapel app to enhance mobile initiative


By Optimist Editorial Board
Posted on September 12, 2011 | Editorials | 1 comment

ACU’s Mobile Learning Initative has reached a proud turning point: every student on campus has an Apple device. Now is the university’s chance to take off with Mobile Learning. The problem presented by students without devices is gone.

Apple touts a massive selection of nearly 500,000 apps which make communication more efficient, free time more fun and studying for Organic Chemistry a little more bearable.

But at ACU, paper quizzes, a map in the back of a planner and a schedule only accessible on myACU still meet students in the classroom. And ACU only offers a handful of apps via Apple’s App Store.

ACU SA Vote, an app, allowed students to vote for amendments in 2010. And ACU Connected, created for the Connected Summit, provided information about speakers and schedules. However, both of these apps were made for a specific event and are now outdated. ACU MindWire, which allows professors to publish study materials for students, is rarely used and hasn’t been updated since 2009.

For a university that so heavily promotes mobile learning, we have created little programming to allow these devices to better our education. While myACU is mobile friendly, ACU still lacks an application to bring a range of university information together in a convenient form.

Stanford’s campus app, iStanford, does many of the things that would be nice in an ACU app. Students can browse and enroll in courses, view athletic news, schedules and scores, access a campus directory, check their student account, follow local events, search an interactive map and even find books in the library, all in one app.

While we look forward to (hopefully) seeing all this in an app we propose a smaller-scale, ACU-specific app: the ChapApp. The ChapApp would provide students with their Chapel credit status at their fingertips and send notifications when the student is on the verge of Chapel probation. The content of Mark Lewis’ weekly Chapel email would be as easily accessible on Friday as it is on Monday – no digging through email inboxes necessary.

It can be hard to get a good idea of what Small Group Chapels are available each semester. The ChapApp would make a complete list readily available and easily updated.

Chapel Forums add great variety to the Chapel experience, but they tend to sneak up at odd afternoon or evening hours. A push notification from the app would remind students of added Chapel opportunities.

A large-scale ACU specific app that isn’t a bookmarked website would make checking grades simple and keeping track of classes and assignments effortless. An application could make our time in and out of the classroom more productive and beneficial, but a great place to start is with an app for Chapel.

Apps for ACU are the key to the success of ACU’s vision of mobile learning. Putting the device in the students’ hands is not enough. ACU needs to take the initiative and create the apps students need.

editorialboard Posted by Optimist Editorial Board on Sep 12th, 2011 and filed under Editorials. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. Both comments and pings are currently closed.  - This post has been viewed 81742 times.

1 Response for “Chapel app to enhance mobile initiative”

  1. baldridges baldridges says:

    While the Chapelapp is a step in the right direction, looking at the mobile learning initiative solely based on the amount of apps we are cranking out may be a little misguided. The article says this:

    “For a university that so heavily promotes mobile learning, we have created little programming to allow these devices to better our education. While myACU is mobile friendly, ACU still lacks an application to bring a range of university information together in a convenient form.”

    We have to look at what you truly mean by “better our education.” If the only thing you are looking for from the mobile learning initiative is to save you from having to dig through your inbox, to help you find your classroom, or to let you know if you are being kicked out of school because you miss chapel you may never truly be satisfied. However, remember that ACU is light-years ahead of most other universities in the world when it comes to using these devices in a learning capacity. Sure not all classes use them, and sure we don’t have all of the answers . . . but at least we are beginning to ask the right questions. Questions that go far beyond how many apps we have created. Questions about learning, not necessarily convenience.

    Dr. Stephen Baldridge, Social Work

Comments are closed